Mam xxx cafat

Geill represents *galjet; these j- stems are not have not found it in Middle-Welsh texts.

Some writers use it excessively often, like Charles Edwards in Hanes y Ffydd (1677); but in the literary language it is avoided.

There is a growing tendency in Middle-Welsh to supplant the terminations of the optative by those of the conjunctive, i.e, oe (oy) and wy in the lst and 3rd sing. by o, with the exception only of the lst sing., in which -wyf and -of are both used.

58: nydoes kenyvi atalloef ycgnic (sic, to you) namin vimare ahunnu nys taluaf (sic) ycgui ac nis gustlaf. of Carm., 18: creddoe (guledchuỳ, 16; dirchafuỳ, 18, etc.

A classification of verbs is therefore the first requisite, and the solution of this problem will, in all likelihood, be furnished by the variety of terminations still existing in some parts of the verb.

The syllables forming the latter were dropped in Welsh, according to the laws governing the phonetic treatment of final syllables, and the actually existing endings are the result of the different sounds characteristic of the stems, modified by the influence of the lost original terminations.

-iff has heen explained as an erroneous ahstraction of a termination from ceiff. -wynt is comnion in the South-Welsh recensions of the Laws, and in Southern Middle-Welsh MSS. 180 (delhont, six other MSS.); yr hynn auo petrus gantunt ac a vynh6ynt . Rowlands, Gramm., 4/80, has the colloquial endings -iff, -ith, or -yth. Yr Arw: dyudith (says), sonith, gofynith, 20, 1, 59. 106; thewith hi byth yn dragowydd (ni th.), a mi 'ddawith ddwad rwsnos nesa, p.

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